Additional Sources for the Ichmul de Morley Panels

Dear readers,

Shortly after publishing Research Contribution 9 (our latest blog), follower and supporter Karl-Herbert Mayer brought to our attention that Teobert Maler had visited Ichmul and photographed Panel 1 and Panel 2 in the late 19th and/or early 20 century, quite some time earlier than Sylvanus Morley. Thanks to Karl’s lead, and with Bill Ringle’s help, Maler’s photographs of the Ichmul panels have been found and are, in fact, available to download at https://digital.iai.spk-berlin.de/viewer/image/1049600878/1/LOG_0003/. Greg Smith’s revised Research Contribution 9 is now posted in place of the original.

Bruce Love and Meghan Rubenstein, Publishers
Contributions to Mesoamerican Studies

Research Contribution 9: The History of the Ichmul de Morley Ballplayer Panels, by J. Gregory Smith

 

 

Ichmul de Morley, Panels 1 and 2

Research Contribution 9 and Corpus Volume 9 are here published simultaneously; both are about the carved stone panels known as Ichmul de Morley Panels 1 and 2. The Research Contribution, by Gregory Smith, details the early history of the discovery of the panels by Sylvanus Morley and their subsequent documentation, while the Corpus Volume presents recent photographs and drawings of them by Bruce Love.

Corpus Volume 9: Ichmul de Morley, Yucatán, Mexico

Research Contribution 9: The History of the Ichmul de Morley Ballplayer Panels, by J. Gregory Smith

The Lost Murals of San Bartolo

The Murals of San Bartolo rightly stand as one of the great archaeological discoveries of recent times, and thus, their discovery deserves further attention.

In 2002, a few months after the murals came to light, freelance journalist Cyril Mischler recorded the story as told to him by Peten guide and outfitter Bernhard “Bernie” Mittelstaedt, long-time petenero and guide for Ian Graham and David Stuart. Later that same year, author Mischler visited the murals with Bernie to see for himself, and in 2007 made another trip, at which time photos were taken for a 2010 article on the topic published in Overland Journal, a magazine dedicated to “worldwide vehicle-supported expedition and adventure travel.”

If this report is correct, Bernie Mittelstaedt and Mariano Catalan deserve to be recognized for discovering the San Bartolo Murals.

We publish a downloadable PDF of this article, with permission from Overland Journal, in order to make this information accessible to a readership in Mesoamerican studies that might not otherwise have known that this version of the story exists.

-Bruce Love and Meghan Rubenstein

Research Contribution 8: The Lost Murals of San Bartolo, Overland Journal, by Cyril Mischler

New Data from Santoton, Ocosingo, Chiapas, Mexico

In our most recent post, we bring you a research contribution by Alejandro Sheseña and Ángel Sánchez Gamboa that offers fresh insight into the archaeological site of Santoton in the municipio of Ocosingo, Chiapas.

As a reminder, if you would like to be notified by email when we upload a new Corpus or Research Contribution, you can sign up in the right-hand menu under Follow Blog via Email (or at the bottom of the page if you are on a mobile device).

-Bruce Love and Meghan Rubenstein

Research Contribution 7: El Sitio Arqueológico de Santoton, Ocosingo, Chiapas, México. Nuevos Datos

The 260-day Calendar among Contemporary K’iche’

In September 2018, I attended a conference at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in which a graduate student from there presented a remarkably in-depth picture of contemporary use of the Cholq’ij, or 260-day calendar, among contemporary K’iche’ of Guatemala. I later received a copy of his UNAM Master’s thesis and was so impressed with its depth and erudition that I requested he allow us to publish it on our website, to which he generously agreed.

Iván Canek Estrada Peña’s thesis combines a century of ethnographic studies with his own findings from intensive fieldwork among the guías espirituales and day keepers of highland Guatemala to produce, in my opinion, the best work ever written on the subject.

-Bruce Love

Research Contribution 6: Traditions and Innovations around the 260-day Calendar among Contemporary K’iche’: the Case of the Day Imox

Museo del Camino Real, Hecelchakan

Research Contribution 5 is dedicated to Karl Herbert Mayer, one of the great explorer-publishers of our time. Ever since I told him I photographed the monuments in the Hecelchakan museum in 2012 and 2013, he has been hounding me to publish them. At first I had no website to publish them on nor permission from INAH to publish them in hard copy, and then since starting this website, I declined to publish them because I had not yet made the drawings.

Now, sadly, our friend Karl’s health is declining and recently he once more urged me to publish the Hecelchakan monuments for the good of the field, an appeal I could not deny. Since our website’s corpus volumes are photos and drawings side by side, and because we do not yet have drawings of the Hecelchakan monuments, we are publishing this body of work as a Research Contribution rather than a Corpus Volume.

This is for you Karl, with immense appreciation for all you have done to move Mesoamerican studies forward.

-Bruce Love

Research Contribution 5: Monuments from Museo del Camino Real de Hecelchakan, Campeche, Mexico